Children Of Vietnam Veterans Health Alliance ~ Agent Orange Dioxin Survivors Uniting Internationally ~ 501C3 Registered Non-Profit
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AGENT ORANGE LEGISLATION ALERT

http://covvha.net/

When we founded COVVHA, we felt it imperative to begin a database of illnesses and birth defects that we, the second generation, have been living with. To date, the list has grown to nearly 800 illnesses that many of our members are suffering from. Most have no prior family history. Additionally, we have a database tracking the illnesses for the grandchildren (third generation) as well.Other reports indicate that there are up to 30 years of illnesses and conditions being collected that we suffer from as the second generation. While many of us are born with these problems, our members that participated in this list are generally between the ages of 20-45 both male and female, often with no prior family history. It’s past time for the United States Government to pay attention!  Use this POPVOX ACTION LINK  that COVVHA has set up for you to contact your state representative directly by email.

CLICK ON PICTURE TO GO TO ACTION PAGE

Agent Orange Study For Vietnam Vets Children Needs Your Support

http://covvha.net/

U.S. Senator Jerry Moran (R-Kan.) has introduced legislation to research the health conditions of descendants of veterans who were exposed to toxins during their military service. The Toxic Exposure Research Act of 2014, which is supported by the Vietnam Veterans of America and AMVETS, would establish a national center for research on the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions stemming from exposure to toxins such as Agent Orange in Vietnam, Gulf War neurotoxins, burn pits in Iraq and other chemicals from recent overseas conflicts. U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) joined Sen. Moran in introducing the legislation.

“The Toxic Exposure Research Act is about addressing the painful, residual wounds of war that may impact a service member’s family long after the military operation is over – wounds that may not be evident until decades later when passed on to children and generations to follow,” Sen. Moran said. “The Toxic Exposure Research Act is a necessary step toward making certain our military men and women and their descendants will be properly cared for in the future. We must keep our promise to our veterans and their families, who have made great sacrifices for the sake of our country’s security and our freedom.”

The Toxic Exposure Research Act of 2014 would also authorize the Department of Defense to declassify certain incidents of exposure of members of the armed forces to toxic substances. Additionally the bill would create a national outreach campaign on potential long-term health effects of exposure to toxic substances by members of the Armed Forces and their descendants.

Many of the symptoms from toxic exposure are frequently misdiagnosed in descendants of veterans due to a lack of understanding and scientific proof. However, veterans have observed increased levels of cancers, birth defects and other conditions in their subsequent generations. The evidence of these wounds of war afflicting the children and grandchildren of service members exposed to toxins is growing and research is warranted to collect data and study this issue. The goal of this medical research is to determine the conditions that result from debilitating toxins and hopefully lead to the appropriate support and benefits veterans and family members deserve.

Source:http://covvha.net/legislation-research-health-descendants-vets-exposed-toxins

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On October 16, 2011, Kelly L. Derricks (TRUTH TELLER) traveled to New York City where she gave a public speech about Agent Orange after being invited by Millions Against Monsanto to participate in the rally event for World Food Day.  Below is the video recording of that speech.

Kelly has battled severe health issues since she was born that continue today. Some of her illnesses, presumed to be associated with the inter-generational effects of Agent Orange, include but are not limited to the following:

• Chronic kidney disease
• Crohn’s disease
• Addison’s disease
• Congenital adrenal hyperplaysia
• Intersticial cystitis.

*Her complete list of illnesses staggers to 30 different things.

Kelly continues to fight for the Children of Vietnam Veterans as well as Vietnam Veterans and their families. In January of 2012 She Co-Founded The Non-Profit Organization (COVVHA) Children Of Vietnam Veterans Health Alliance INC

Visit The Main Website At WWW.COVVHA.NET

https://www.youtube.com/user/teppnme?feature=watch

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By; John J. Bury, USN, retired, Vietnam War Veteran
Author for ©COVVHA

It was back in the summer of 2012. Doug Ferguson, Director of Alumni Programs of Delaware County Community College called me. He inquired about a couple article I had written for our locale newspaper, the Delaware County Time, Media, Pa. We chatted about those articles, his thought was my writing was an inspiration to veterans who needed help. I told Doug there are several articles I had written, all of which had been published nationwide. I sent all of them to him. Told him my writings speak for themselves. My thinking was that he was curious about what I write and why.

As time passed on, nothing more from Doug. I had forgotten all about his inquiry. It was about the last week of October, I receive an e-mail from Doug to call him. In our phone conversation, he announced to me that I had been selected by the college, of which I am a graduate Class of ‘85, to be Veteran of the month November 2012, veterans month. I was very much surprised to be selected for this honor. My thought at the moment, who am I to be so honored? There are many veterans out there other then me. The college has well over 250 veterans attending the college. I felt surely there were some who had been wounded in battle and some who had been award various medals for their heroism. Their story would be more interesting then my own.

Doug’s comment to me was, the Vietnam war with all its criticism back in the day, there was a need for its recognition; plus the work I was doing in having Vietnam veterans recognize, especially those who fell sick to Agent Orange Dioxin poisoning. He sent me a format of five question. A BIO of my college days and what that education did for me. Sort of a life experience during and after college.

I gave much thought of what and how to write this BIO. I though something brief, to the point and factual, sort of in a way I normally write for the news media. Hence, below is what I came up with: Also The actual write up as published in the Alumni news bulletin, goto: www.dccc.edu/alumni-and-friends/alumni-news-and-updates
Alumni News and Updates Delaware County Community College.

1. What year did you graduate from Delaware County Community College and with what degree? 1985. Business Management. Did it the hard way. Worked all day, college at night.

2. Did you pursue further academic goals? No.

3. Where are you now? Living in Middletown Township, Delaware County, Media, Pa. Retired.

4. What is next for you professionally? After retiring from the US Navy with 22 years service in 1975, I took a job with Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades teaching disciplines of engineering in the Power Technology Department. After eight years, I moved on to become Director of Engineering and Plant Facilities at Westtown School. I retired from the work force in 1999. Some years later I become an Advocate for Vietnam War Veterans many of these veterans are infected with Agent Orange Dioxin who had served on land, in the air and at sea. Presently I am a writer/columnist, being published in news publications nationwide. I write about the effects of Agent Orange Dioxin and what it has/is doing to those who served in the Vietnam War. My goal is to have House Bill HR-3612 and Senate Bill S.1629, passed. These two Bills if passed will afford Vietnam veterans of all branches of service the VA benefits and compensation they deserve.

5. What advice would you give to current students and Alumni to capitalize on the education they receive from the College? Move forward at a pace you are comfortable with. Learn from other workers, those who know the job best, they are your asset to excel. As one of my DCCC professors would say, “Always remember there are two sides to a coin, understand both sides before coming to a conclusion.” Sounds like good advise to me.

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“So many veterans contacted us who needed help and didn’t understand why the military wouldn’t help them,” Stichman said.  The Defense Department did not respond to repeated requests for comment on the ruling.

In most cases, veterans will receive back pay for missed retirement payments as well as medical charges they accrued since their discharge. Each veteran with a disability rating above 50 percent will qualify to purchase life insurance coverage through the Survivor Benefit Plan; lifetime commissary and military post exchange privileges; eligibility for Combat-Related Special Compensation; tax free retirement payments; and lifetime medical care for themselves, their spouse and their children up to age 18.

Stichman and his organization heard from frustrated veterans who didn’t understand why the military didn’t automatically adjust their ratings if they had a PTSD diagnosis in their record. The NVLSP enlisted the help of law firms that volunteer their time to represent veterans, such as Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP.

The legal team requested a list of every veteran discharged between 2002 and 2008 with a record of PTSD. The team received a list of 4,400 veterans and immediately set up phone banks to contact each one. Over 2,100 joined.

The courts lifted the moratorium set on the case and the veterans waited until Dec. 22, when the U.S. Court of Federal Claims ruled in their favor.

“It’s very often the military doesn’t do things unless they are forced to do it, especially when it comes to personnel and those who are already out,” Stichman said.

Judge George Miller’s ruling ordered the military to pay lifetime disability benefits to 1,029 veterans. It also increased the disability rating of another 1,066 veterans who have received disability benefits upon separation, but received a rating below 50 percent. The ruling also promised benefits to another 66 veterans who were class members, but had not yet completed their retirement benefits application through Veteran’s Affairs. Read the full story…

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“So many veterans contacted us who needed help and didn’t understand why the military wouldn’t help them,” Stichman said.  The Defense Department did not respond to repeated requests for comment on the ruling.

In most cases, veterans will receive back pay for missed retirement payments as well as medical charges they accrued since their discharge. Each veteran with a disability rating above 50 percent will qualify to purchase life insurance coverage through the Survivor Benefit Plan; lifetime commissary and military post exchange privileges; eligibility for Combat-Related Special Compensation; tax free retirement payments; and lifetime medical care for themselves, their spouse and their children up to age 18.

Stichman and his organization heard from frustrated veterans who didn’t understand why the military didn’t automatically adjust their ratings if they had a PTSD diagnosis in their record. The NVLSP enlisted the help of law firms that volunteer their time to represent veterans, such as Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP.

The legal team requested a list of every veteran discharged between 2002 and 2008 with a record of PTSD. The team received a list of 4,400 veterans and immediately set up phone banks to contact each one. Over 2,100 joined.

The courts lifted the moratorium set on the case and the veterans waited until Dec. 22, when the U.S. Court of Federal Claims ruled in their favor.

“It’s very often the military doesn’t do things unless they are forced to do it, especially when it comes to personnel and those who are already out,” Stichman said.

Judge George Miller’s ruling ordered the military to pay lifetime disability benefits to 1,029 veterans. It also increased the disability rating of another 1,066 veterans who have received disability benefits upon separation, but received a rating below 50 percent. The ruling also promised benefits to another 66 veterans who were class members, but had not yet completed their retirement benefits application through Veteran’s Affairs. Read the full story…

www.COVVHA.net
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© 2014 ‎(COVVHA) Children Of Vietnam Veterans Health Alliance INC